Commentary: Working Alone This week, reporter Rick Bragg, a Pulitzer winner, resigned from The New York Times. Earlier this month, the paper revealed that reporter Jayson Blair had fabricated details and plagiarized quotations in his stories. Bragg was suspended for a less serious offense, relying heavily on the work of an uncredited assistant. Bragg maintained that he did nothing out of the ordinary... and commentator James Poniewozik says that journalists are not the only ones who don't work alone. Renaissance masters and famous scholars no more originate all their own material than Ray Kroc flipped every last McDonald's hamburger.
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Commentary: Working Alone

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Commentary: Working Alone

Commentary: Working Alone

Commentary: Working Alone

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This week, reporter Rick Bragg, a Pulitzer winner, resigned from The New York Times. Earlier this month, the paper revealed that reporter Jayson Blair had fabricated details and plagiarized quotations in his stories. Bragg was suspended for a less serious offense, relying heavily on the work of an uncredited assistant. Bragg maintained that he did nothing out of the ordinary... and commentator James Poniewozik says that journalists are not the only ones who don't work alone. Renaissance masters and famous scholars no more originate all their own material than Ray Kroc flipped every last McDonald's hamburger.