Italian Police Arrest Hundreds In Anti-Mafia Raids Italian police have carried out a series of raids -- part of an extensive crackdown against organized crime. Three hundred suspected members of the powerful 'Ndrangheta crime syndicate are behind bars, including its suspected leader. Police also recovered more than $75 million worth of stolen cash and property.
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Italian Police Arrest Hundreds In Anti-Mafia Raids

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Italian Police Arrest Hundreds In Anti-Mafia Raids

Italian Police Arrest Hundreds In Anti-Mafia Raids

Italian Police Arrest Hundreds In Anti-Mafia Raids

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128506439/128506454" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Italian police have carried out a series of raids — part of an extensive crackdown against organized crime. Three hundred suspected members of the powerful 'Ndrangheta crime syndicate are behind bars, including its suspected leader. Police also recovered more than $75 million worth of stolen cash and property.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

It was one of the biggest police sweeps ever carried out in Italy. And when it was over, more than 300 people had been rounded up, all of them suspected of belonging to one of the world's most powerful crime syndicates. The arrests took place throughout the country, showing that the mafia's reach has spread far beyond its southern roots. NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports from Rome.

SYLVIA POGGIOLI: Italy's top anti-mafia prosecutor, Pietro Grasso, said the sweep has revealed the Ndrangheta's power structure similar to the Sicilian mafia.

PIETRO GRASSO: (Italian spoken)

POGGIOLI: Roberto Galullo, a reporter for Il Sole 24 Ore, says Italian mobs now have sway throughout the country.

ROBERT GALULLO: (Through translator) There is not one Italian region that is not invaded by organized crime. It is no longer a southern problem but a national emergency. And that emergency is the need to restore the rule of law.

POGGIOLI: Sylvia Poggioli, NPR News, Rome.

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