Opening Panel Round Our panelists answer questions about the week’s news: BP puts safety first.
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Opening Panel Round

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Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

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Our panelists answer questions about the week’s news: BP puts safety first.

PETER SAGAL, Host:

We want to remind everybody they can join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium. For tickets and more information, go to chicagopublicradio.org, where you can find a link at our website, waitwait.npr.org.

Right now, panel, it's time for you to answer some questions about this week's news.

Charlie, the New York Times reported on BP's long history of safety violations. It turns out they've been blowing stuff up for decades. But the company insists that safety is now job one. In fact, the CEO, Tony Hayward, recently instituted a rule preventing employees at BP from doing what?

M: Dating Bristol Palin.

SAGAL: That's...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: The other BP.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: The other safe one.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

M: Listen, listen, British Petroleum is an evil BP. Bristol Palin is a kind of a fun, distracting, silly BP.

SAGAL: That's true.

M: And both involved in drilling in their own way.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: All right, yes. And yes, but it's not Bristol's fault that the cap wasn't kept on the well. That was...

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

M: That's Levi's.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No, it has nothing to do with Bristol Palin. No, this goes back to the Grande French Roast spill of '07.

M: What? No more coffee?

SAGAL: Well, close.

M: I mean no more drinking at, like, your terminal and stuff.

SAGAL: You're close enough. You're not allowed to walk down the hallway carrying hot coffee.

M: Walk down the hallway?

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Yes. That's what they say.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: When Tony Hayward took the reins of BP in 2007, he pledged to fix the company's safety problems, and priority number one was avoiding unpleasant coffee burns. Priority number 400, not ruining the world.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So at BP, many hallways at their headquarters have a sign imploring employees not to walk and carry coffee at the same time. Workplace hot beverage- related incidents are way down. So following the success of that coffee safety plan, crews are now posting signs on all their deepwater wells, saying, please do not spill all the oil into the ocean.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

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