Iraq Media There are new newspapers on the streets of Baghdad and, for the past two weeks, a new television station in town. Funded by the U.S. civil administration, the Iraqi media network has an editing suite in Saddam's old bedroom at the Baghdad convention center. However, their biggest competition is an Iranian station that began broadcasting in Arabic at the start of the war. It's a race for hearts and minds. Some in the new media say the U.S. was slow to enter the game and is paying a price for that. NPR's Deborah Amos reports.

Iraq Media

Iraq Media

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There are new newspapers on the streets of Baghdad and, for the past two weeks, a new television station in town. Funded by the U.S. civil administration, the Iraqi media network has an editing suite in Saddam's old bedroom at the Baghdad convention center. However, their biggest competition is an Iranian station that began broadcasting in Arabic at the start of the war. It's a race for hearts and minds. Some in the new media say the U.S. was slow to enter the game and is paying a price for that. NPR's Deborah Amos reports.

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