U.N. Offers Novel Tips To Farmers Fighting Animals It's a problem plaguing farmers the world over: wild animals that wreck their crops. To the rescue comes the United Nations. For bothersome baboons, for example -- try putting a live snake inside a hollowed out loaf of bread. Elephants rummaging through your rutabagas? The U.N. urges farmers to shoot them with a harmless ping-pong ball full of chili peppers. It explodes on impact, and that elephant will never forget.

U.N. Offers Novel Tips To Farmers Fighting Animals

U.N. Offers Novel Tips To Farmers Fighting Animals

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It's a problem plaguing farmers the world over: wild animals that wreck their crops. To the rescue comes the United Nations. For bothersome baboons, for example — try putting a live snake inside a hollowed out loaf of bread. Elephants rummaging through your rutabagas? The U.N. urges farmers to shoot them with a harmless ping-pong ball full of chili peppers. It explodes on impact, and that elephant will never forget.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

Good morning. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

It's a problem plaguing farmers the world over: wild animals that wreck their crops. To the rescue comes the United Nations, with some helpful tips. For bothersome baboons, for example, try putting a live snake inside a hollowed-out loaf of bread. Or elephants rummaging through your rutabagas? The U.N. urges farmers to shoot them with a harmless ping-pong ball full of chili peppers. It explodes on impact, and that elephant will never forget.

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