Letters: 'Zero Emissions' Cars, Chelsea Clinton Listeners weigh in on the reality of "zero emissions" cars, set one of our political commentators straight, and take us to task for covering the media circus around former first daughter Chelsea Clinton's wedding. Michele Norris reads from our virtual mailbag.
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Letters: 'Zero Emissions' Cars, Chelsea Clinton

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Letters: 'Zero Emissions' Cars, Chelsea Clinton

Letters: 'Zero Emissions' Cars, Chelsea Clinton

Letters: 'Zero Emissions' Cars, Chelsea Clinton

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/128936478/128936748" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Listeners weigh in on the reality of "zero emissions" cars, set one of our political commentators straight, and take us to task for covering the media circus around former first daughter Chelsea Clinton's wedding. Michele Norris reads from our virtual mailbag.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR News. I'm Michele Norris.

We got letters on a wide range of stories from Friday's program, and here are just a few.

Several of you pricked up your ears during our interview about the shortcomings of the new electric car the Chevy Volt, particularly when our guest mentioned zero-emissions vehicles.

Eric Lindbergh(ph) of Milwaukee writes this: How do you keep a straight face when you talk about the zero-emissions car? These cars don't have zero emissions, and there's no such thing as a zero-emissions car. Their emissions are simply emitted somewhere else.

And Vi Knight(ph), an engineer from Chattanooga, Tennessee, writes this: The all-electrics simply have their emissions at the power plant rather than the HOV lane. He goes on: Please take care in technical stories to draw proper boundaries, and challenge the marketing terms that are misleading and not factual.

Mary Hernandez(ph) of Burbank, California, also wrote in to set the record straight, but her beef was about a statement made by one of our regular political commentators. Hernandez said: I heard David Brooks refer to the Arizona immigration law as a law voted on by the people of Arizona. I'd like to remind him that it was enacted by the state legislature, hence the name SB 1070. The people of Arizona did not directly vote on the bill.

Finally, several of you complained about our story on the nuptials of former first daughter Chelsea Clinton, which took place this weekend in Rhinebeck, New York.

Mark Benozoli(ph) of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, had this to say: When did respectable media outlets such as NPR decide to mimic the seedy likes of the National Enquirer? The Clinton and Mezvinsky families have requested respect of their privacy during this very important moment in their lives. Not so hard to understand, but apparently irresistible when considering the all-mighty scoop. Benozoli concludes: I hope none of your daughters and sons will be so disrespected when they marry.

Well, take us to task, praise us - just keep telling us what you think. You can do that at npr.org. Click on contact us at the bottom of the page.

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