Can't Pronounce Nevada Correctly? You're Not Alone Las Vegas is a city where anything goes -- except mispronouncing the name of its home state. It's nuh-VAD-uh, not nuh-VAH-dah, if you want to avoid boos from the locals. It's a problem in election years for visiting politicians. An outgoing Las Vegas assemblyman wants a resolution making both versions of Nevada OK. The odds are against it.
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Can't Pronounce Nevada Correctly? You're Not Alone

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Can't Pronounce Nevada Correctly? You're Not Alone

Can't Pronounce Nevada Correctly? You're Not Alone

Can't Pronounce Nevada Correctly? You're Not Alone

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129372119/129372118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Las Vegas is a city where anything goes — except mispronouncing the name of its home state. It's nuh-VAD-uh, not nuh-VAH-dah, if you want to avoid boos from the locals. It's a problem in election years for visiting politicians. An outgoing Las Vegas assemblyman wants a resolution making both versions of Nevada OK. The odds are against it.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Las Vegas is a city where anything goes, except mispronouncing the name of its home state. It's nuh-VAD-uh, not nuh-VAH-dah, if you want to avoid boos from the locals. It's a problem in election years for visiting pols. President Bush once got it wrong. So did First Lady Michelle Obama. An outgoing Las Vegas assemblyman wants a resolution making both versions of Nevada OK. Don't bet on it.

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