'Alive' Survivors Reach Out To Trapped Chilean Miners Some of the survivors of the 1972 Andean plane crash who lived for almost two months stranded in the mountains have arrived at the mine in Chile where 33 men are trapped underground. Host Liane Hansen explains how they have brought a message of solidarity to the miners.
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'Alive' Survivors Reach Out To Trapped Chilean Miners

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'Alive' Survivors Reach Out To Trapped Chilean Miners

'Alive' Survivors Reach Out To Trapped Chilean Miners

'Alive' Survivors Reach Out To Trapped Chilean Miners

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Some of the survivors of the 1972 Andean plane crash who lived for almost two months stranded in the mountains have arrived at the mine in Chile where 33 men are trapped underground. Host Liane Hansen explains how they have brought a message of solidarity to the miners.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

They have food, water and medicine passed through tiny bore holes, even rosary beads blessed by Pope Benedict. Yesterday, the 33 trapped miners received message of hope and support delivered personally by four men who can empathize with their plight as few others can.

Ramone Sabella, Pedro Alcorta, Jose Inciarte, and Gustavo Servino played for a rugby team whose plane crashed in the Andes in 1972. Their story was told in the book "Alive." It described how they survived alone in the frozen mountains for more than two months before being rescued, and how some of them stayed alive by eating the flesh of their dead friends and teammates.

The four ex-athletes, now middle-aged men, visited the mine yesterday and spoke to the miners by video. Gustavo Servino delivered their message of solidarity.

Mr. GUSTAVO SERVINO: (Foreign language spoken)

HANSEN: He says: We've come here as an act of gratitude and solidarity with the Chilean people. We've come to give them a little faith and hope because they know we were able to survive what we went through; to say we're at their service if they need us for anything. And above all, to give support to the families outside waiting for these miners.

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