Arcade Fire, A Mystery Man And PTSD Vs. TBI As combat operations formerly end in Iraq, the military is still trying to grapple with how to handle the so-called invisible wounds like PTSD and TBI. Also, the curious case of Benjaman Kyle, a man in his 60s who remembers almost nothing about his life or who he was before 2004. Plus, how the band Arcade Fire made a music video about your childhood – that's pretty amazing – and the dean of jazz journalism, Nat Hentoff, on a life covering the likes of Dizzy, Duke and Miles.
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Arcade Fire, A Mystery Man And PTSD Vs. TBI

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Arcade Fire, A Mystery Man And PTSD Vs. TBI

Arcade Fire, A Mystery Man And PTSD Vs. TBI

Arcade Fire, A Mystery Man And PTSD Vs. TBI

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129774365/129755177" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Colby Buzzell was diagnosed with PTSD after returning home. Courtesy Colby Buzzell hide caption

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Courtesy Colby Buzzell

As combat operations formerly end in Iraq, the military is still trying to grapple with how to handle the so-called invisible wounds like PTSD and TBI. Also, the curious case of Benjaman Kyle, a man in his 60s who remembers almost nothing about his life or who he was before 2004. Plus, how the band Arcade Fire made a music video about your childhood – that's pretty amazing – and the dean of jazz journalism, Nat Hentoff, on a life covering the likes of Dizzy, Duke and Miles.