Mideast Peace Deal Faces Hurdle Over Settlements Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas met for a second day to talk about a peace deal. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that the parties were "getting down to business," but it was unclear how they would overcome a dispute over Jewish settlements in the West Bank.
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Mideast Peace Deal Faces Hurdle Over Settlements

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Mideast Peace Deal Faces Hurdle Over Settlements

Mideast Peace Deal Faces Hurdle Over Settlements

Mideast Peace Deal Faces Hurdle Over Settlements

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/129888739/129888731" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas met for a second day to talk about a peace deal. U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that the parties were "getting down to business," but it was unclear how they would overcome a dispute over Jewish settlements in the West Bank.

MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

MICHELE KELEMEN, Host:

Secretary Clinton says the U.S. will stand by the two as they make tough decisions.

HILLARY CLINTON: This is the time and these are the leaders.

KELEMEN: Speaking earlier in the day, she told reporters that the status quo is unsustainable and the Israeli and Palestinian leaders know it.

CLINTON: I have listened to them talk candidly and forcefully. They are getting down to business. And they have begun to grapple with the core issues that can only be resolved through face-to-face negotiations.

KELEMEN: Michele Kelemen, NPR News, Jerusalem.

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