'Wall Street' Sequel Needs More Evil Greed may be good, as Gordon Gekko insisted once upon a time, but evil pays the bills. Sadly, there isn't enough evil to make the sequel Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps a good enough movie.
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'Wall Street' Sequel Needs More Evil

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'Wall Street' Sequel Needs More Evil

'Wall Street' Sequel Needs More Evil

'Wall Street' Sequel Needs More Evil

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Greed may be good, as Gordon Gekko insisted once upon a time, but evil pays the bills. Sadly, there isn't enough evil to make the sequel Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps a good enough movie.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Here's our financial advisor Kenneth Turan.

KENNETH TURAN: So let's hear it for fearless 94-year-old Eli Wallach, who makes eccentric chirping noises and reminisces about the crash of 1929, and some applause for Josh Brolin, an arrogant investment banker with an ego the size of Antarctica. He's always looking for new hotshot traders to add to his team.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS")

JOSH BROLIN: (as Bretton James) The mentor-protégé relationship is not emotional over anything. And I thought you might be a good addition to the Churchill Schwartz team. Am I mistaken?

SHIA LABEOUF: (as Jake Moore) Let me tell you something, Bretton. You are not my mentor. So you may talk about moral hazard - you are the moral hazard. You are the worst kind of toxic that this system is polluted with.

TURAN: Only one thing is sure: Without him "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" would be even more of a snooze than it already is.

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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