Hallmark Cards, Paris Hilton Settle Lawsuit Paris Hilton's catchphrase is "that's hot." Hallmark made a greeting card that spoofed Hilton using the phrase. Hilton took out a trademark on "that's hot" in 2007 so she sued the card company. Hallmark announced Tuesday it reached a settlement with Hilton.
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Hallmark Cards, Paris Hilton Settle Lawsuit

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Hallmark Cards, Paris Hilton Settle Lawsuit

Hallmark Cards, Paris Hilton Settle Lawsuit

Hallmark Cards, Paris Hilton Settle Lawsuit

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Paris Hilton's catchphrase is "that's hot." Hallmark made a greeting card that spoofed Hilton using the phrase. Hilton took out a trademark on "that's hot" in 2007 so she sued the card company. Hallmark announced Tuesday it reached a settlement with Hilton.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And today's last word in business is: that's hot.

That's socialite and reality TV star Paris Hilton's catchphrase. Hallmark Cards made a greeting card that spoofed Hilton using that phrase and she was not amused. Hilton apparently took out a trademark on the words - that's hot - in 2007, so she sued the card company. The legal drama has finally come to an end. Hallmark announced yesterday that it reached a settlement with Paris Hilton. No word about the terms of the settlement, although Hallmark presumably is sending a we're sorry card.

And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

ARI SHAPIRO, host:

And I'm Ari Shapiro.

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