Your Letters: N.Y. Smoking Ban; Dogfighting Words Host Scott Simon reads listeners' mail, including responses to NPR reporter Robert Smith's story about a proposed smoking ban in New York City; last week's interview with the author of the book, Dogfight; and celebrating National Punctuation Day.
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Your Letters: N.Y. Smoking Ban; Dogfighting Words

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Your Letters: N.Y. Smoking Ban; Dogfighting Words

Your Letters: N.Y. Smoking Ban; Dogfighting Words

Your Letters: N.Y. Smoking Ban; Dogfighting Words

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130287314/130287288" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Host Scott Simon reads listeners' mail, including responses to NPR reporter Robert Smith's story about a proposed smoking ban in New York City; last week's interview with the author of the book, Dogfight; and celebrating National Punctuation Day.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Time now for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPING AND MUSIC)

SIMON: We had more than a hundred comments at NPR.org about Robert Smith's story about a proposed ban on outdoor smoking in New York City. Many hope the ban would improve air quality. But Shadeed Ahmad(ph) says: In order for the quality of air to be realistically better, a lot of air problems have to be addressed in New York City: bad body odors, smelly subways, recreational smoking drugs, auto exhaust, and all cigarette smoking. New York City is losing enough of its charm already, he adds, let's not take one more step towards feeling like we're in a straitjacket with bed bugs inside.

SIMON: The city is stressful. I don't know how I can be there without a cigarette.

A L, Host:

But a lot of praise for the interview Mary Louise did last week with punctuation expert Jeff Rubin.

JEFF RUBIN: There was one from the Feast of San Gennaro, which is a big event in Little Italy in Manhattan. And it said Fried Oreo's, meaning the cookie, O-R-E-O apostrophe S.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, Host:

Heresy.

RUBIN: Yes, it is.

SIMON: Several people shared their own punctuation pet peeves and frustrations about inept grammar. What about then with an E and than with an A, wonders Diana Voelinger(ph). What about all the past participles that evidently are not being taught in school? When I hear, I would have gave you one, or, I should have ate that, et cetera, I lose my mind.

SIMON: To send an email, you just go to NPR.org and click on Contact Us. We're also on Twitter. I tweet @nprscottsimon, all one word. And the entire WEEKEND EDITION staff is @nprweekend.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I LOVE YOU PERIOD")

DAN BAIRD: (Singing) I love you period. And do you love me, question mark? Please, please, exclamation point. I want to hold you in parentheses. I love you period. Do you love me question mark? Please, please exclamation point. I want to hold you in parentheses.

SIMON: This is NPR News.

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