Your Letters: Anonymous Hero; Steinbeck's Journeys Host Scott Simon reads listeners' mail, including responses to his essay last week about a great-grandmother rescued from her flooded car and his conversation with Bill Steigerwald about his journey along the same path traveled by author John Steinbeck and his poodle Charley.
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Your Letters: Anonymous Hero; Steinbeck's Journeys

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Your Letters: Anonymous Hero; Steinbeck's Journeys

Your Letters: Anonymous Hero; Steinbeck's Journeys

Your Letters: Anonymous Hero; Steinbeck's Journeys

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/130452342/130452365" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Host Scott Simon reads listeners' mail, including responses to his essay last week about a great-grandmother rescued from her flooded car and his conversation with Bill Steigerwald about his journey along the same path traveled by author John Steinbeck and his poodle Charley.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Time now for your letters.

(SOUNDBITE OF TYPING AND MUSIC)

SIMON: Last week we spoke with Judy Shepard about recent suicides of young gay people, including that of Tyler Clementi, a student at Rutgers. Judy Shepard's son Matthew was murdered 12 years ago because he was gay. Mrs. Shepard tries to encourage young gays.

JUDY SHEPARD: You want them to be honest with who they are and about their future, and to recognize that you are who you are and you love who you love, and that's just the way it is.

SIMON: A number of listeners complained that we were wrong to interview Judy Shepard, because it implies that Tyler Clementi was a victim of the same kind of crime that killed Matthew Shepard.

SIMON: From the quotes I read of the actual tweets and posts, this wasn't about intolerance of gays. Of course it doesn't make as good a story if it was just two 18-year-old kids just doing something stupid, and then another student doing something tragic.

SIMON: Well, we welcome all of your comments. You can go to NPR.org, click on Contact Us. You can post a comment on any story at NPR.org. We're also on Twitter. I tweet @NPRScottSimon - all one word. The entire WEEKEND EDITION staff is @NPRWeekend.

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