Nobel Laureate's Wife Under House Arrest A human rights group says the wife of Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo was placed under house arrest after returning from visiting her husband in prison. Liu won the peace prize on Friday.
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Nobel Laureate's Wife Under House Arrest

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Nobel Laureate's Wife Under House Arrest

Nobel Laureate's Wife Under House Arrest

Nobel Laureate's Wife Under House Arrest

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A human rights group says the wife of Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo was placed under house arrest after returning from visiting her husband in prison. Liu won the peace prize on Friday.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

Rob, tell us about the meeting over the weekend.

ROB GIFFORD: Liu Xiaobo was a very prominent member of those protestors and he was one of the guiding people. He was a junior professor at the time. And he apparently wept when he met with his wife, and was very emotional, as you can imagine.

WERTHEIMER: But she's got people outside her apartment, police - many police - and she's not allowed to make phone calls at all.

WERTHEIMER: So the details that he wept, that he's dedicating it to the Tiananmen Square deaths, that all comes from tweets?

GIFFORD: China is undergoing a social and economic revolution. It's being transformed, convulsed by change. The one area where it will not change, says the Communist Party, is in the political sphere. So the deep, deep contradictions between the social and media and economic transformation, and the absolute intransigence on anything political is really captured by this whole scenario over the weekend - of him still in jail and her tweeting about it to the world.

WERTHEIMER: What impact has this had on other dissidents and activists in China?

GIFFORD: Indeed, the media here have been very, very blunt in condemning it, saying this just shows a prejudiced West afraid of China's rising wealth and power, to quote one Chinese newspaper.

WERTHEIMER: Thanks very much, Rob.

GIFFORD: Thank you, Linda.

WERTHEIMER: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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