Want To Eat Healthy? Pay With Cash A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research says credit and debit card users tend to use their plastic to buy junk food. The study is based on the shopping habits of 1,000 households. Researchers found credit and debit card users tended to impulse buy more often.
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Want To Eat Healthy? Pay With Cash

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Want To Eat Healthy? Pay With Cash

Want To Eat Healthy? Pay With Cash

Want To Eat Healthy? Pay With Cash

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  • Transcript

A study published in the Journal of Consumer Research says credit and debit card users tend to use their plastic to buy junk food. The study is based on the shopping habits of 1,000 households. Researchers found credit and debit card users tended to impulse buy more often.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, host:

Today's last word in business is the nutritional value of money. Specifically, if you want to eat healthy, pay with cash.

That's the finding of a new study published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

The study says credit and debit card users tend to use their plastic to buy junk food. This study is based on the shopping habits of 1,000 households. The researchers found that credit and debit card users tended to impulse buy more often.

Mmm. Pop Tarts.

(Soundbite of laughter)

KELLY: I think Doritos would be my downfall.

INSKEEP: Okay, fine.

(Soundbite of laughter)

KELLY: Yeah. But apparently, the pain of parting with real money is enough for us to fight those cravings for junk food. So the message from the study is: If you want to watch your weight, lose that plastic before you leave the house.

(Soundbite of music)

KELLY: And that's the business news on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Mary Louise Kelly.

INSKEEP: And I'm Steve Inskeep.

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