Zeroing In On Bomb Plot Suspects U.S. authorities are looking for suspects linked to the package bombs that were bound for the U.S. last week. The packages were addressed to two Jewish institutions in Chicago, but were intercepted in the United Kingdom and Dubai. The bombs were hidden inside HP computer printers -- in each case, the toner inside the printer cartridge was emptied out and replaced with a powerful explosive. That's one of the reasons why the bombs were hard to detect.
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Zeroing In On Bomb Plot Suspects

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Zeroing In On Bomb Plot Suspects

Zeroing In On Bomb Plot Suspects

Zeroing In On Bomb Plot Suspects

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U.S. authorities are looking for suspects linked to the package bombs that were bound for the U.S. last week. The packages were addressed to two Jewish institutions in Chicago, but were intercepted in the United Kingdom and Dubai. The bombs were hidden inside HP computer printers — in each case, the toner inside the printer cartridge was emptied out and replaced with a powerful explosive. That's one of the reasons why the bombs were hard to detect.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

On a Monday morning, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Good morning.

DINA TEMPLE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: Let's start with suspects in the case. I mean, first, what happened with these two women that had been, you know, reported on over the weekend?

TEMPLE: Apparently the shopkeeper who accepted the packages came to a line-up to identify Samawi. And he said she wasn't the person who came into his shop to send the packages. Someone had used her name. So now they're looking for the woman who did mail the packages.

MONTAGNE: And does this mean that the investigation is back to square one?

TEMPLE: Well, not exactly. I mean they're zeroing in, now, on a bomb maker from al-Qaida's arm in Yemen. This is an organization called al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP. And his name is Ibrahim Asiri. He's 28. He's a Saudi national. And apparently he's a high-ranking member of AQAP.

MONTAGNE: And why him?

TEMPLE: So none of these plots have worked yet, but it appears he's good and creative at making bombs - he just hasn't had a successful attack yet.

MONTAGNE: Well, then what about this particular plot? We heard authorities are looking for other packages. Does that mean the threat is not over?

TEMPLE: I think once they get all that worked out and all these various things accounted for, I think they'll breathe a little easier.

MONTAGNE: Dina, thanks very much.

TEMPLE: You're welcome.

MONTAGNE: NPR's Dina Temple-Raston.

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