Glacier Science Whether a glacier flows at a plodding rate or suddenly slides at dangerous speeds is controlled by forces at the bottom of the ice, an area generally inaccessible to scientists. Researchers have now tunneled to the bottom of a glacier in Norway and found that the mechanics of sliding ice are not quite what geologists had thought. These findings could change predictions of how these melting rivers of ice will respond to a warming planet. NPR's John Nielsen reports.
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Glacier Science

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Glacier Science

Glacier Science

Glacier Science

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Whether a glacier flows at a plodding rate or suddenly slides at dangerous speeds is controlled by forces at the bottom of the ice, an area generally inaccessible to scientists. Researchers have now tunneled to the bottom of a glacier in Norway and found that the mechanics of sliding ice are not quite what geologists had thought. These findings could change predictions of how these melting rivers of ice will respond to a warming planet. NPR's John Nielsen reports.