Study: Ethnicity, Education Linked to Domestic Violence A study from the University of Arkansas suggests that college-educated, African-American women are at a greater risk of being abused by a spouse or significant other. In this week's Behind Closed Doors, Zoe Flowers, an author and survivor of domestic abuse, shares her story and her reaction to the findings.
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Study: Ethnicity, Education Linked to Domestic Violence

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Study: Ethnicity, Education Linked to Domestic Violence

Study: Ethnicity, Education Linked to Domestic Violence

Study: Ethnicity, Education Linked to Domestic Violence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/13744340/13744321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A study from the University of Arkansas suggests that college-educated, African-American women are at a greater risk of being abused by a spouse or significant other.

In this week's Behind Closed Doors, Zoe Flowers, author of Dirty Laundry, and a domestic abuse survivor, shares her story and her reaction to the findings.