Church and State It's not unusual for public officials, including President Bush, to express their religious beliefs in the public sphere. But some wonder whether this is a violation of the First Amendment's separation of church and state. NPR's Liane Hansen talks with Sarah Gordon, a professor of law and history at the University of Pennsylvania, about the history of this important legal doctrine. Gordon is the author of The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America.
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Church and State

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Church and State

Church and State

Church and State

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1391467/1391468" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

It's not unusual for public officials, including President Bush, to express their religious beliefs in the public sphere. But some wonder whether this is a violation of the First Amendment's separation of church and state. NPR's Liane Hansen talks with Sarah Gordon, a professor of law and history at the University of Pennsylvania, about the history of this important legal doctrine. Gordon is the author of The Mormon Question: Polygamy and Constitutional Conflict in Nineteenth-Century America.