Bids to Unlock iPhone Yield Mixed Results AT&T's legal team has discouraged one company's efforts to offer software that would open up Apple's iPhone to services not provided by AT&T. But a 17-year-old has posted instructions on the Web for how to unlock the iPhone — using a soldering gun.
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Bids to Unlock iPhone Yield Mixed Results

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Bids to Unlock iPhone Yield Mixed Results

Bids to Unlock iPhone Yield Mixed Results

Bids to Unlock iPhone Yield Mixed Results

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/13966273/13966231" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

AT&T's legal team has discouraged one company's efforts to offer software that would open up Apple's iPhone to services not provided by AT&T. But a 17-year-old has posted instructions on the Web for how to unlock the iPhone — using a soldering gun.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

People who love Skype might like to use it on the most hyped phone in history. The trouble is that the iPhone is linked exclusively to AT&T. You can't use any other companies.

One group announced that it has software that frees the iPhone so you could use other companies, and they were planning to sell that software until they got a 3:00 a.m. phone call from AT&T's legal team over the weekend.

You can, however, still find the instructions that a 17-year-old posted on the Web. He revealed how to unlock the iPhone, provided you are willing to attack your pricy phone with a soldering gun.

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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