Africans Making New Lives in America The number of African immigrants in the U.S. has more than tripled over the past decade, according to the Census Bureau. Compared to African Americans, educated Africans are getting higher paying jobs. As such, many new immigrants don't feel welcomed by black Americans.
NPR logo

Africans Making New Lives in America

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/13999588/13999575" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Africans Making New Lives in America

Africans Making New Lives in America

Africans Making New Lives in America

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/13999588/13999575" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wanjiru Kamau, founder and executive director of The African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation Courtesy Wanjiru Kamau hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Wanjiru Kamau

The number of African immigrants in the U.S. has more than tripled over the past decade, according to the Census Bureau. The influx is diverse, from scholars to illiterate refugees. More than 40 percent have college degrees, which is higher than the U.S. average.

Compared to African Americans, educated Africans are getting the higher paying jobs. As such, many new immigrants don't feel welcomed by black Americans.

Farai Chideya talks with Kenyan Wanjiru Kamau, founder and executive director of The African Immigrant and Refugee Foundation, and Ethiopian Tesfa Gemeda about assimilating to life in the U.S.