Even Spiders Know Everything's Bigger in Texas Lake Tawakoni State Park in Texas has some new tenants: spiders – lots of spiders. And they have spun a giant communal web. Several hundred yards along a nature trail have been taken over by the elaborate arachnid construction.
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Even Spiders Know Everything's Bigger in Texas

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Even Spiders Know Everything's Bigger in Texas

Even Spiders Know Everything's Bigger in Texas

Even Spiders Know Everything's Bigger in Texas

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A giant spider web spans part of Lake Tawakoni State Park in Texas. Donna Garde/Texas Parks and Wildlife Department hide caption

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Donna Garde/Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

A giant spider web spans part of Lake Tawakoni State Park in Texas.

Donna Garde/Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

Lake Tawakoni State Park in Texas has some new tenants: spiders – lots of spiders. And they've spun a giant communal web.

Several hundred yards along a nature trail have been taken over by the elaborate arachnid construction. Webs stretch from tree to tree — and down to the ground.

Donna Garde, the superintendent of the park, talks with Melissa Block.