Charlie Savage, In Pursuit of the Imperial President Pulitzer Prize winner Charlie Savage detailed how often President Bush often used "signing statements" to assert the right to bypass provisions of new laws. His new book more fully describes how the Bush-Cheney administration has expanded executive power.
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Charlie Savage, In Pursuit of the Imperial President

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Charlie Savage, In Pursuit of the Imperial President

Charlie Savage, In Pursuit of the Imperial President

Charlie Savage, In Pursuit of the Imperial President

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From the NPR News Blog

In his daily riffs on the headlines, NPR news blogger Tom Regan often highlights Charlie Savage's reporting. Two examples:

Boston Globe reporter Charlie Savage won a 2007 Pulitzer Prize for a series detailing how often President Bush used "signing statements" — controversial assertions of a chief executive's right to bypass provisions of new laws.

Now Savage has written a book describing how the Bush-Cheney administration has expanded executive power. It's called Takeover: The Return of the Imperial Presidency and the Subversion of American Democracy.

Books Featured In This Story

Takeover

The Return of the Imperial Presidency and the Subversion of American Democracy

by Charlie Savage

Hardcover, 400 pages |

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Title
Takeover
Subtitle
The Return of the Imperial Presidency and the Subversion of American Democracy
Author
Charlie Savage

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