New Film Casts Doubt on 'Made in USA' Label A new film about the L.A. garment district documents the struggles of immigrants who work long hours in poor conditions for sub-minimum wages. Made in L.A. follows three female workers as they fight for labor law protection.
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New Film Casts Doubt on 'Made in USA' Label

New Film Casts Doubt on 'Made in USA' Label

Listen to this 'Talk of the Nation' topic

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14185253/14185233" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Garment workers in Made in LA protest in downtown Los Angeles. Felicity Murphy hide caption

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Felicity Murphy

Garment workers in Made in LA protest in downtown Los Angeles.

Felicity Murphy

"Made in USA" is a label that is meant to inspire trust in American manufacturing. But a new film about the Los Angeles garment district documents the struggles of immigrants who work long hours in poor conditions for sub-minimum wages.

Filmmaker Almudena Carracedo shadowed three garment workers as they waged a three-year battle for workers' rights. After months of protests and boycotts, the women forced a major clothing retailer to negotiate.

Carracedo's film, Made in LA, debuted Tuesday evening on PBS as part of the POV series.

Almudena Carracedo, director, producer, cinematographer, and co-editor of Made in LA

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