Mathematicians Work to Help Track Terrorist Activity Researchers in math, computer science and criminology met this week to discuss the ways math could be used to track terrorists. Guests talk about how math and science techniques help officials recognize connections between seemingly unrelated pieces of data, and find online terrorist networks.
NPR logo

Mathematicians Work to Help Track Terrorist Activity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14422690/14422686" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Mathematicians Work to Help Track Terrorist Activity

Mathematicians Work to Help Track Terrorist Activity

Mathematicians Work to Help Track Terrorist Activity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14422690/14422686" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Researchers in math, computer science and criminology met this week to discuss the ways math could be used to track terrorist activity. Guests talk about how math and science techniques help officials recognize connections between seemingly unrelated pieces of data, and find online terrorist networks.

Bernard Brooks, professor of mathematics and head of research programs at the School of Mathematical Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology

Hsinchun Chen, director of the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and professor of management information systems, University of Arizona