Competitors Build Moon Rovers for Lunar X-Prize In the 1960s, the U.S. and Soviet Union were in a race to the moon. Now, the Lunar X-Prize has challenged today's generation to a do-it-yourself space race. Backed by money from Google, X-Prize is offering as much as $30 million to the team that builds the best privately funded, robotic rover.
NPR logo

Competitors Build Moon Rovers for Lunar X-Prize

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14594331/14594327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Competitors Build Moon Rovers for Lunar X-Prize

Competitors Build Moon Rovers for Lunar X-Prize

Competitors Build Moon Rovers for Lunar X-Prize

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14594331/14594327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In the 1960s, the U.S. and Soviet Union were in a race to the moon. Now, the Lunar X-Prize has challenged today's generation to a do-it-yourself space race. Backed by money from Google, X-Prize is offering as much as $30 million to the team that builds the best privately funded, robotic rover.

Guest:

Peter H. Diamandis, chairman and CEO of the X PRIZE Foundation