Strike Could Hurt Union, GM, U.S. economy Contract talks between the United Auto Workers members and General Motors are deadlocked over health care provisions, wages and other issues. If it continues, it could impact the union, automaker and the U.S. economy.
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Strike Could Hurt Union, GM, U.S. economy

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Strike Could Hurt Union, GM, U.S. economy

Strike Could Hurt Union, GM, U.S. economy

Strike Could Hurt Union, GM, U.S. economy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14672181/14663274" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Contract talks between the United Auto Workers members and General Motors are deadlocked over health care provisions.

Lindland says the strike surprised analysts because the talks between UAW and GM were going well. But the health care impasse and disputes over wages, job security and work rules stalled the negotiations and led the union to strike.

Should the strike continue, it could harm the union, GM — even the U.S. economy if the automaker is unable to get its products to dealerships across the country and around the world.

Rebecca Lindland, senior automotive analyst with Global Insight research firm, talks to Madeleine Brand about the strike and what it means for the automobile industry.