Khrushchev, Schorr Look Back on Sputnik On Oct. 4, l957, the Soviet Union launched the first man-made satellite. Sputnik marked the beginning of the Space Age, as well as a turning point in the Cold War. Sergei Khrushchev and Dan Schorr remember this milestone in human history.
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Khrushchev, Schorr Look Back on Sputnik

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Khrushchev, Schorr Look Back on Sputnik

Khrushchev, Schorr Look Back on Sputnik

Khrushchev, Schorr Look Back on Sputnik

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/14829415/14829390" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On Oct. 4, l957, the Soviet Union launched the first man-made satellite. Sputnik marked the beginning of the Space Age, as well as a turning point in the Cold War.

Sergei Khrushchev, the son of then-Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, and Dan Schorr, who was then Moscow Bureau chief for CBS News, talk with Scott Simon about the significance of Sputnik.

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