Hermaphrodite Worms Show Biological Imperative A new article in the journal Science explains the need for sexual reproduction in the largely hermaphroditic population of nematode worms. Over 99 percent of nematodes are females who can produce their own sperm and self-fertilize. NPR's Liane Hansen speaks with University of Wisconsin genetics professor Elizabeth Goodwin.
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Hermaphrodite Worms Show Biological Imperative

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Hermaphrodite Worms Show Biological Imperative

Hermaphrodite Worms Show Biological Imperative

Hermaphrodite Worms Show Biological Imperative

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1498649/1498650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A new article in the journal Science explains the need for sexual reproduction in the largely hermaphroditic population of nematode worms. Over 99 percent of nematodes are females who can produce their own sperm and self-fertilize. NPR's Liane Hansen speaks with University of Wisconsin genetics professor Elizabeth Goodwin.