'Shmita' Year Controversy in Israel Israel is celebrating a shmita year, when the Torah bans farming on Jewish-owned lands. A new ruling by the chief rabbinate has left the level of observance to local religious leaders, embroiling this shmita in controversy.
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From Oct. 10, Rabbi Julian Sinclair explains the shmita year

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'Shmita' Year Controversy in Israel

'Shmita' Year Controversy in Israel

From Oct. 10, Rabbi Julian Sinclair explains the shmita year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/15143103/15143080" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Jews around the world recently celebrated the Jewish New Year, ringing in what's known as a shmita, or sabbath year. A shmita occurs every seventh year, when the Torah states that no crops are to be grown on Jewish-owned lands in Israel.

A new ruling by the chief rabbinate has left the level of observance to the decision of local religious leaders, embroiling this shmita in controversy.