Egypt's Opposition May Be Losing Steam Amr Hamzawy, who works at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, says a movement opposing Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak has lost much of what the U.S. government thought was momentum.
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Egypt's Opposition May Be Losing Steam

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Egypt's Opposition May Be Losing Steam

Egypt's Opposition May Be Losing Steam

Egypt's Opposition May Be Losing Steam

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Amr Hamzawy, who works at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, says opposition to Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak has lost much of what the U.S. government thought was momentum. Hamzawy speaks with Deborah Amos about Egypt's pullback from what once looked like democratic reforms.