Adopting Briana In the late 1980s and early 1990s, crack and HIV set off an explosion of "boarder babies" at hospitals. The infants, abandoned at birth, often required extensive medical care. Prospects for adoption were bleak. But today, children like five-year-old Briana are finding permanent homes. NPR's Joseph Shapiro reports.
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Adopting Briana

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Adopting Briana

Adopting Briana

Adopting Briana

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In the late 1980s and early 1990s, crack and HIV set off an explosion of "boarder babies" at hospitals. The infants, abandoned at birth, often required extensive medical care. Prospects for adoption were bleak. But today, children like five-year-old Briana are finding permanent homes. NPR's Joseph Shapiro reports.