'Morning Edition' Returns: Hot Potato A humanitarian group in Toronto says it's found a way to help the homeless survive in below-zero weather: Give them a potato. The group is giving each homeless person a freshly boiled potato stuffed into a sock. The hot spud can keep a sleeping bag warm for five hours, or keep pants warm for three hours. Once it finally cools off, the homeless can eat the potato, and wear the sock.
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'Morning Edition' Returns: Hot Potato

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'Morning Edition' Returns: Hot Potato

'Morning Edition' Returns: Hot Potato

'Morning Edition' Returns: Hot Potato

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1604752/1604753" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A humanitarian group in Toronto says it's found a way to help the homeless survive in below-zero weather: Give them a potato. The group is giving each homeless person a freshly boiled potato stuffed into a sock. The hot spud can keep a sleeping bag warm for five hours, or keep pants warm for three hours. Once it finally cools off, the homeless can eat the potato, and wear the sock.