Energy Secretary Investigates Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu is at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation to personally investigate concerns about the site's waste treatment plant.
NPR logo

Energy Secretary Investigates Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160570876/160570897" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Energy Secretary Investigates Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant

Energy Secretary Investigates Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant

Energy Secretary Investigates Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/160570876/160570897" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

RICHLAND, Wash. – U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu is at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation this week. Chu’s taking time out of his schedule to personally investigate concerns raised about Hanford’s massive waste treatment plant in southeast Washington.

No Alternative Text

Energy Secretary Steven Chu is personally investigating concerns over Hanford's waste treatment plant. Photo courtesy Dept. of Energy hide caption

toggle caption

Secretary Chu has a Ph.D. in physics. And he’s leading a top-flight team of eight nuclear and engineering experts in an on-site investigation into Hanford’s $12 billion waste treatment plant.

They’re especially focused on the plant’s black cells. These are huge rooms inside the factory that will be so radioactively hot that they’re permanently sealed-off from humans.

“They may make recommendations for design changes or operational enhancements that may improve the performance and safety of the plant,” says the Department of Energy's Carrie Meyer.

Chu’s visit comes just as Hanford managers have now found a total of three areas of suspect material in the space between two walls of a double-hulled tank. Energy officials are planning further checks to determine what the stuff is and whether are more areas of concern.

On the Web:

Energy Department's 'black cells' review:

http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-announces-new-technical-review-assess-black-cells-hanford-s-waste

Copyright 2012 Northwest Public Radio