Toys Recalled for Lead, GHB More than 400,000 Chinese toys, mostly cars, have been recalled because they might contain lead. Meanwhile, the toy sold as Aqua Dots is being recalled because its colorful beads contain a chemical that converts into the so-called date rape drug GHB.

Toys Recalled for Lead, GHB

Toys Recalled for Lead, GHB

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More than 400,000 Chinese toys, mostly cars, have been recalled because they might contain lead. Meanwhile, the toy sold as Aqua Dots is being recalled because its colorful beads contain a chemical that converts into the so-called date rape drug GHB.

ALISON STEWART, host:

Another toy recall. Do not sigh and roll your eyes. This one's for a really unusual reason. Chemicals in one of this year's hottest toys reportedly metabolize into the so-called date-rape drug.

MIKE PESCA, host:

The toys are called Aqua Dots. They made the list of Wal-Mart's top 12 most popular Christmas toys this year. They're made in China.

STEWART: Now the Consumer Product Safety Commission is recalling millions of the toys after children in the states and Australia reportedly swallowed the little liquid-filled beads and some suffered seizures, in some cases falling into a coma.

PESCA: It's helpful to realize how Aqua Dots work. You arrange these little beads into a design, and you spray them with water and the beads fuse together. The problem is the beads are coated with a chemical that the human body metabolizes into gamma hydroxybutyrate, or GHB. An overdose of GHB can be fatal.

STEWART: Here's Scott Wilson, the spokesman for the Consumer Product Safety Commission, in an interview with the Associated Press.

Mr. SCOTT WILSON (Spokesman, Consumer product Safety Commission): It's an arts and craft type of toy - very colorful, very playful. These beads are loose. They can be handled by the youngest of children, and if they're swallowed, this becomes a very dangerous product. We know of two children in the United States who swallowed a handful of these loose beads, and have put them into a comatose state. We don't want another child hurt at all by this product, so we want parents taking it away immediately.

STEWART: It's amazing. The beads really do look like little jelly beans. And fortunately, the two children Wilson mentioned, they've recovered.

PESCA: Meantime, there's another recall on the same day. It's lead. It's from China. It's more than 405,000 toys, mostly little toy cars. They were ordered off store shelves. Check out our Web site for the latest list of recalls.

STEWART: That's the BPP Big Story. Now, here's Rachel Martin with the rest of the news.

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