Senate Mulls Immunity for Telecoms Senators consider whether phone companies should be let off the hook for allowing the National Security Agency to tap customers' phone calls and e-mails without a court warrant. Whistleblower Mark Klein, a retired AT&T technician, says it gives the NSA access to all Internet communications.
NPR logo

Senate Mulls Immunity for Telecoms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16105375/16104999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Senate Mulls Immunity for Telecoms

Senate Mulls Immunity for Telecoms

Senate Mulls Immunity for Telecoms

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16105375/16104999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senators are struggling with whether phone companies should be let off the hook if they allow the National Security Agency to tap customers' phone calls and e-mails without a court warrant.

Whistleblower Mark Klein, a retired AT&T technician, describes a secret room at an AT&T facility in San Francisco entirely controlled by the NSA. He says it gives the NSA wholesale access to all Internet communications coming through.

Klein is in Washington lobbying against a proposal to grant immunity to telecom companies facing lawsuits over eavesdropping.