Joke Stealing Is No Laughing Matter, Comedians Say It's not uncommon for comedians to borrow punchlines from other stand-up routines — but some say this practice of "joke-jacking" is becoming more common among big-name entertainers. Comedy writer Larry Getlen and stand-up comic Ralphie May discuss how comedians generate material that is both funny and original.
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Joke Stealing Is No Laughing Matter, Comedians Say

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Joke Stealing Is No Laughing Matter, Comedians Say

Joke Stealing Is No Laughing Matter, Comedians Say

Joke Stealing Is No Laughing Matter, Comedians Say

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16117576/16117562" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

It's not uncommon for comedians to borrow punchlines from other stand-up routines — but some say this practice of "joke-jacking" is becoming more common among big-name entertainers. Comedy writer Larry Getlen and stand-up comic Ralphie May discuss how comedians generate material that is both funny and original.

Guests:

Larry Getlen, comedian and writer, author of "Take the Funny and Run", an article in Radar about the culture of joke stealing

Ralphie Mae, comedian