Digging for Dinosaurs in Antarctica A discovery some 13,000 feet up a frozen mountain in Antarctic suggests the continent was once a pleasant place to live. NPR's Christopher Joyce reports that a team of researchers from Illinois have cut from the rock the bones of a huge, long-necked, long-tailed sauropod. See expedition pictures.
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Digging for Dinosaurs in Antarctica

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Digging for Dinosaurs in Antarctica

Digging for Dinosaurs in Antarctica

Giant Bones Suggest Icy Continent Had Warmer Past

Digging for Dinosaurs in Antarctica

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1612988/1613407" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Paleontologist William Hammer inspects a specimen on Mount Kirkpatrick, located in the Transantarctic Mountain Chain near Beardmore Glacier. Augustana College hide caption

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Augustana College

Antarctica is probably the most remote and inhospitable place on the planet to look for dinosaur bones. But, in fact, the continent was once home to many big animals, including some fearsome enough for a starring role in Jurassic Park. NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on a new discovery that was made 13,000 feet up Antarctica's frozen Mount Kirkpatrick.

Paleontologist William Hammer of Illinois' Augustana College has dug up a pelvic bone and parts of limbs belonging to a sauropod that likely lived some 200 million years ago. The finding points to an Antarctica that was once not such a harsh place to live.