Novelist Hamid Reflects on Pakistan's Crackdown Pakistani-born novelist Mohsin Hamid says at first he was disappointed that Musharraf and his opponents couldn't work out a compromise. But as he received e-mails about the extent of the crackdown, he became convinced that compromise with a dictator only perpetuates the dictatorship.
NPR logo

Novelist Hamid Reflects on Pakistan's Crackdown

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16143476/16142971" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Novelist Hamid Reflects on Pakistan's Crackdown

Novelist Hamid Reflects on Pakistan's Crackdown

Novelist Hamid Reflects on Pakistan's Crackdown

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/16143476/16142971" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pakistani-born novelist Mohsin Hamid says at first he was disappointed that Musharraf and his opponents couldn't work out a compromise. But as he received e-mails about the extent of the crackdown, he became convinced that compromise with a dictator only perpetuates the dictatorship.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Novelist Mohsin Hamid has been on the receiving end of electronic messages from Pakistan this week, which got him thinking about the past.

MOHSIN HAMID: I strongly prefer to look for compromise. But I am no longer a child, as I was in the 80s, able to shut my eyes when bad things happen. I recognized that there comes a time when compromise with a tyrant serves only to perpetuate tyranny. I'm saddened by my anger, for anger on a scale of a nation can lead to dangerous places. But I feel it nonetheless, and it is growing.

MONTAGNE: Commentator Mohsin Hamid is author of "The Reluctant Fundamentalist."

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Related NPR Stories