Don Imus Dials Back In The once and future king of commercial talk radio returns to the airwaves.
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Don Imus Dials Back In

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Don Imus Dials Back In

Don Imus Dials Back In

Don Imus Dials Back In

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The once and future king of commercial talk radio returns to the airwaves.

LUKE BURBANK, host:

Well, good news America - maybe. Don Imus is back on the radio. "Imus in the Morning" debuted on WABC radio in New York this morning, and nationwide on RFD-TV. It's been eight months since he was fired from CBS radio and MSNBC for talking smack about the Rutgers women's basketball team. We all remember that.

The first six minutes of the show this morning had no Don Imus whatsoever. There was a commercial for Hackensack Medical Center and…

ALISON STEWART, host:

He was riveting. So he's…

(Soundbite of laughter)

BURBANK: …the local traffic report. And it kind of…

STEWART: Boy.

BURBANK: …weird, stuttering newscast. After that, though, when Don Imus actually did take to the airwaves, he spent the first 30 minutes of the show talking about the impact that his comments had, not on just on him, but on the team, Rutgers' team, and race relations in the U.S. And he was very contrite.

Here's a little bit from the opening of that show.

(Soundbite of show, "Imus in the Morning")

Mr. DON IMUS (Radio Host): A couple of minutes now, to talk about what happened back on April 12th. On April 12th, we did this show, and we were scheduled to meet with the team that night at the governor's mansion in Princeton. No one knew that. So around four o' clock that afternoon, I got a call from Les Moonves at CBS, and he said, we can't take the pressure, and we're going to have to pull the plug. And I said I understood that.

There was never at any point that he said oh, everything's going to be fine or whatever. We understood the gravity of the remark. We understood the consequences for the young women at Rutgers, and we all recognized, and I certainly did, think that it was just a matter of time before he did what he had to do.

BURBANK: Still got it. That riveting radio went on for another 25 minutes or so after that.

STEWART: Now, the guests on today's show are historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, and answering the question: would candidates be appearing on Imus? A lot of people were wondering about that. Senator John McCain and Chris Dodd were going to appear, as well as James Carville and Mary Madeleine, and this just in: Dateline.

There's been a lot made that there were going to be black people on Imus' show. Woo, imagine that. The AP is identifying - this is - I love when it's written like this - the AP identifies two of the new Imus cast members as quote, "black comedians," Karith Foster and Tony Powell. So we shall see.

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