U.S. Sees New Advantage in N. Korea Talks U.S. officials travel to Beijing next week for a second round of six-way talks aimed at eliminating North Korea's nuclear programs. U.S. officials say America enters the talks with a stronger hand, citing Libya's decision to end its nuclear weapons programs, and revelations that North Korea benefited from nuclear secrets passed from Pakistan. NPR's Vicky O'Hara reports.
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U.S. Sees New Advantage in N. Korea Talks

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U.S. Sees New Advantage in N. Korea Talks

U.S. Sees New Advantage in N. Korea Talks

U.S. Sees New Advantage in N. Korea Talks

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1683846/1683847" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

U.S. officials travel to Beijing next week for a second round of six-way talks aimed at eliminating North Korea's nuclear programs. U.S. officials say America enters the talks with a stronger hand, citing Libya's decision to end its nuclear weapons programs, and revelations that North Korea benefited from nuclear secrets passed from Pakistan. NPR's Vicky O'Hara reports.