Fake Web Site Turns Real Profit For fun, Linda Katz created the "Prairie Tumbleweed Farm," a make-believe Internet company that supposedly sold the dry, rolling shrubs: $15 for a small one, $25 for a big one. Then real orders started to come.
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Fake Web Site Turns Real Profit

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Fake Web Site Turns Real Profit

Fake Web Site Turns Real Profit

Fake Web Site Turns Real Profit

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A woman in southwest Kansas wanted to learn how to create a Web site. For fun, Linda Katz created the "Prairie Tumbleweed Farm," a make-believe Internet company that supposedly sold the dry, rolling shrubs: $15 for a small one, $25 for a big one. Then real orders started rolling in. So she had to rustle up some tumbleweeds for Hollywood movie sets. NASA bought some to test the Mars Rover. The Prairie Tumbleweed Farm even has Web page translation for Japanese consumers! Katz's initial lark has been lucrative. After 13 years in the international tumbleweed trade, she reportedly makes about $40,000 a year.