Father Says Steroid Battle Is About Life and Death Don Hooton is an outspoken critic of performance-enhancing drugs and has helped in the investigation of baseball players. Hooton's son was a high school baseball player who used steroids, then suffered from depression — a common side effect — and killed himself.
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Father Says Steroid Battle Is About Life and Death

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Father Says Steroid Battle Is About Life and Death

Father Says Steroid Battle Is About Life and Death

Father Says Steroid Battle Is About Life and Death

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JAMES HATTORI, host:

Now to a man whose personal tragedy helped fuel the national debate about steroids in sports - his name is Don Hooton. Four years ago, his 17-year-old son Taylor killed himself. Don Hooton blames steroids. He's testified on Capitol Hill and consulted on the Mitchell Report, and he's in New York today for the report's release.

Mr. Hooton, thank you for joining us.