Oscar's Depressive Tendencies Washington D.C. video store clerks Adam Robinson and Scott Mueller have had enough of utterly depressing movies winning big at the Oscars. NPR's Neda Ulaby asked the pair to give their take on this year's Oscar race.
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Oscar's Depressive Tendencies

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Oscar's Depressive Tendencies

Oscar's Depressive Tendencies

The View from the Video Store: It's a Sad Year for Oscar

Oscar's Depressive Tendencies

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Scott Mueller, left, and Adam Robinson at the Washington, D.C., video store where they work. Neda Ulaby, NPR hide caption

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Neda Ulaby, NPR

Washington D.C. video store clerks Adam Robinson and Scott Mueller have had enough of utterly depressing movies winning big at the Oscars.

And while The Lord of the Rings may be the favorite for best film this year, there are plenty of glum choices throughout the Academy's many categories, from Monster to House of Sand and Fog.

NPR's Neda Ulaby asked the pair to give their take on this year's Oscar race.