Amazon Forest Growth Puzzles Scientists Forests in a remote part of the Amazon are suddenly growing like teenagers in a growth spurt. This shouldn't be happening in old, mature forests. Scientists think it might be caused by the extra carbon dioxide humans are putting in the air. As a result, some species are getting pushed out and others are taking over -- evidence that no place on Earth is too remote to be changed by human activity. NPR's Christopher Joyce reports.
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Amazon Forest Growth Puzzles Scientists

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Amazon Forest Growth Puzzles Scientists

Amazon Forest Growth Puzzles Scientists

Amazon Forest Growth Puzzles Scientists

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1756130/1756131" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Forests in a remote part of the Amazon are suddenly growing like teenagers in a growth spurt. This shouldn't be happening in old, mature forests. Scientists think it might be caused by the extra carbon dioxide humans are putting in the air. As a result, some species are getting pushed out and others are taking over — evidence that no place on Earth is too remote to be changed by human activity. NPR's Christopher Joyce reports.