Get Hip or Die Trying The nonprofit Goodwill is reinventing itself in Washington, D.C., as a fashionable place to buy clothes, complete with a blogger who plucks the best deals from the shelves. A special BPP video report looks at the challenge of balancing a mission to help the struggling poor with a campaign to draw in the affluent hip.
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Goodwill Stores Call Out to Hipsters

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Goodwill Stores Call Out to Hipsters

Goodwill Stores Call Out to Hipsters

Goodwill Stores Call Out to Hipsters

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The nonprofit Goodwill Industries sees itself as a place for the struggling poor to get help — and, increasingly, as a place for the affluent hip to buy great secondhand clothes.

Goodwill officials say the owners of vintage boutiques have been in on the secret for years, scouring the racks for potential inventory on the cheap. They might pick up a dress for a few bucks, then flip it for several times the purchase price.

Now a group of Goodwill stores in Washington, D.C., is reaching for a share of that wider, cooler market. In this special video report, Goodwill official talks about balancing those two missions, and Goodwill's own fashion blogger talks about the bargains just waiting for the right savvy shopper.

On our blog, a slideshow: The History of Goodwill.

Video: Goodwill works the cool factor