After Breakup, Law Often Treats Gays as Married Supreme courts in many states are debating whether to define marriage as a union between opposite genders. But in recent rulings, judges are treating gay and lesbian couples as if they are married -- especially when it comes to dividing assets and assigning child custody when couples split up. NPR's Tovia Smith reports.
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After Breakup, Law Often Treats Gays as Married

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After Breakup, Law Often Treats Gays as Married

After Breakup, Law Often Treats Gays as Married

After Breakup, Law Often Treats Gays as Married

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1760154/1760155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Supreme courts in many states are debating whether to define marriage as a union between opposite genders. But in recent rulings, judges are treating gay and lesbian couples as if they are married — especially when it comes to dividing assets and assigning child custody when couples split up. NPR's Tovia Smith reports.

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