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Top of the News

Top of the News

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The latest headlines.

JOHN FUGELSANG, host:

Welcome back to THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT from NPR News. We are on digital FM satellite and online at npr.org/bryantpark. I'm John Fugelsang.

ALISON STEWART, host:

And I'm Alison Stewart.

Coming up, Lil Wayne had a very good year in '07. It's not that little. His name is not really just Wayne. But we'll get more details from Kalefeh Sanneh of the New York Times.

FUGELSANG: Words.

STEWART: First, we'll talk to Rachel Martin with the news.

(Soundbite of music)

BILL WOLFF (Announcer): This is NPR.

RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Thanks guys. Good morning everyone.

As we've been reporting, Pakistan's slain opposition leader Benazir Bhutto has been laid to rest in her hometown in Southern Pakistan. She was interred in her family's mausoleum and laid next to her father who was killed in 1979. Her death has triggered a spate of violence around Pakistan - people burned vehicles and raided offices of President Musharraf's political party. At least 20 people have been killed in the violence. Her death has also thrown the upcoming January 8th elections into question.

Bhutto was hoping to use the elections to make a political comeback, giving her a third term as prime minister. After Bhutto's assassination, the country's other major opposition leader Nawaz Sharif has said his party will boycott the election.

Pakistan is a key ally in the U.S.-led war on terror and the recipient of billions of dollars in American aid. U.S. State Department officials say the elections in Pakistan should go forward.

Meanwhile, the San Francisco Zoo is close again today as officials continue to investigate the fatal Christmas Day mauling of a teenager by a Siberian tiger.

Tara Siler of NPR member station KQED in San Francisco has details.

TARA SILER: A zoo official conceded that the wall of the enclosure from which the tiger has escaped is not as high as officials first claimed. Officials actually measured the wall and found it 6 feet lower than they first reported.

Zoo director Manuel Mollinedo said the American Zoological Association, the group that accredits zoos, has never raised any concerns about the enclosure.

Mr. MANUEL MOLLINEDO (Director, San Francisco Zoo): When the AZA came out and inspected our zoo three years ago, they never noted that as a deficiency. Obviously, now that something's happened, we're going to be visiting the actual height.

SILER: Mollinedo says new safety measures, including an electrified fence and security cameras, will be installed around the zoo's big cat enclosures.

MARTIN: That was reporter Tara Siler in San Francisco.

And it wasn't really a Holy War, just a holy brawl of sorts. Yesterday in Bethlehem, Greek Orthodox priests and Armenian priests attacked each other with brooms and stones inside the Church of the Nativity. Dozens of priests were there helping to clean the church, the day ahead of the Armenian and Orthodox Christmas, which is celebrated in January. The church resides over the grotto in Bethlehem where Christians believe Jesus is born and it's administered jointly by Catholics, Greek Orthodox leaders and Armenians.

The clean-up turned dirty after some of the Orthodox faithful stepped inside the Armenian section of the church, touching off a big scuffle. Four people we're wounded.

Finally, if you like the - love the idea of downloading a movie to your computer, but you're too cheap to pay the 13 or so bucks to do it. Besides, I don't want to have to own "Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan," I just want to rent it. So a solution maybe coming sooner; maybe Apple and 20th Century Fox are set to announce a deal that will make consumers rent Fox movies through Apple's iTunes.

The reports sparked heavy selling of Netflix shares yesterday, a leading online DVD rental company and Blockbuster, the largest U.S. movie rental chain.

The Financial Times and the Wall Street Journal reported the deal and it's expected to be announced later this month.

That's the news. It's always online at npr.org.

WOLFF: This is NPR.

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