Ben Harper Serenaded Our Birth Musician Ben Harper played a few songs for the Bryant Park Project and gave the fledgling show some good advice.
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Ben Harper Serenaded Our Birth

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Ben Harper Serenaded Our Birth

Ben Harper Serenaded Our Birth

Ben Harper Serenaded Our Birth

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Musician Ben Harper played a few songs for the Bryant Park Project and gave the fledgling show some good advice.

ALISON STEWART, host:

Back when THE BPP first launched, we were still fighting our footing here in the wilds of public radio. Another guest came into the studio with some good advice for a bunch of slightly nervous souls.

Mr. BEN HARPER (Singer): It's your gig. And that's why you're talking and other people are listening.

STEWART: We hope.

Mr. HARPER: No, that's true. That's it. And there's a certain point, you have to embrace that and own it. There is no room for false modesty; it's more irritating than overconfidence.

STEWART: That's Southern California singer Ben Harper whose good advice extends the lyrics of one of the songs he played in our studio - don't let them take the fight out of you.

So, thanks for the advice, Ben. And just a side note: no more nerves. We are cruising toward awesomeness right now.

(Soundbite of song, "Fight Outta You")

Mr. HARPER: (Singing) They'll look you in the eyes and stone you, then turn and disown you. Don't you let them take the fight outta you. They'll walk all over your name 'til they find someone else to blame. Don't let them take the fight outta you. Secrets hide their lies inside hidden alibis. Don't let them take the fight outta you. They put the world on a hook, it's worse every time I look. Don't let them take the fight outta you.

I would rather take a punch than not give you a shot. I'd rather find out who you are than who you're not -should have known better than to mistake business for love -should have known better than to mistake a fist for a glove.

It will be in your honor 'til you're not needed any longer. Don't let them take the fight outta you. Don't believe the headlines, check it for yourself sometimes. Don't let them take the fight outta you. The lies you live become you; the love you lose it numbs you. Don't let them take the fight outta you They say that you've arrived but that's just a high-class bribe, don't let them take the fight outta you.

I would rather take your punch than not give you a shot. I'd rather find out who you are than who you're not - should have known better than to mistake this last love - should have known better than to mistake a fist for a glove.

There's always someone younger, someone with more hunger. Don't let them take the fight outta you. They'll say you're one and only, then straight up leave you lonely. Don't you let them take the fight outta you. Like a transplant-patient waiting for a donor. Don't let them take the fight outta you. Like a half empty balloon after a party in the corner. Don't let them take the fight outta you.

STEWART: Ben Harper, when he stopped by THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT studios.

Thanks for listening to this hour of THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT. We are always available online at npr.org/bryantpark.

I'm Alison Stewart wishing you a very Happy New year. I hope you spend a lot of '08 with us here at THE BPP.

This is THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT from NPR News. Have a great one.

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